• 2
    Grade 2 Standards
Top Mathematicians
  • Operations and Algebraic Thinking
    • 2.OA.A.1
      Use addition and subtraction within 100 to solve one- and two-step word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknowns in all positions, e.g., by using drawings and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem.
    • 2.OA.B.2
      Fluently add and subtract within 20 using mental strategies. By end of Grade 2, know from memory all sums of two one-digit numbers.
    • 2.OA.C.3
      Determine whether a group of objects (up to 20) has an odd or even number of members, e.g., by pairing objects or counting them by 2s; write an equation to express an even number as a sum of two equal addends.
    • 2.OA.C.4
      Use addition to find the total number of objects arranged in rectangular arrays with up to 5 rows and up to 5 columns; write an equation to express the total as a sum of equal addends.
  • Geometry
    • 2.G.A.1
      Recognize and draw shapes having specified attributes, such as a given number of angles or a given number of equal faces. Identify triangles, quadrilaterals, pentagons, hexagons, and cubes.
    • 2.G.A.2
      Partition a rectangle into rows and columns of same-size squares and count to find the total number of them.
    • 2.G.A.3
      Partition circles and rectangles into two, three, or four equal shares, describe the shares using the words halves, thirds, half of, a third of, etc., and describe the whole as two halves, three thirds, four fourths. Recognize that equal shares of identical wholes need not have the same shape.
  • Measurement and Data
  • Number and Operations in Base Ten
    • 2.NBT.A.1
      Understand that the three digits of a three-digit number represent amounts of hundreds, tens, and ones; e.g., 706 equals 7 hundreds, 0 tens, and 6 ones.
    • 2.NBT.A.1a
      100 can be thought of as a bundle of ten tens — called a 'hundred.'
    • 2.NBT.A.1b
      The numbers 100, 200, 300, 400, 500, 600, 700, 800, 900 refer to one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, or nine hundreds (and 0 tens and 0 ones).
    • 2.NBT.A.2
      Count within 1000; skip-count by 5s, 10s, and 100s.
    • 2.NBT.A.3
      Read and write numbers to 1000 using base-ten numerals, number names, and expanded form.
    • 2.NBT.A.4
      Read and write numbers to 1000 using base-ten numerals, number names, and expanded form.
    • 2.NBT.B.5
      Fluently add and subtract within 100 using strategies based on place value, properties of operations, and/or the relationship between addition and subtraction.
    • 2.NBT.B.6
      Add up to four two-digit numbers using strategies based on place value and properties of operations.
    • 2.NBT.B.7
      Add and subtract within 1000, using concrete models or drawings and strategies based on place value, properties of operations, and/or the relationship between addition and subtraction; relate the strategy to a written method. Understand that in adding or subtracting three-digit numbers, one adds or subtracts hundreds and hundreds, tens and tens, ones and ones; and sometimes it is necessary to compose or decompose tens or hundreds.
    • 2.NBT.B.8
      Mentally add 10 or 100 to a given number 100–900, and mentally subtract 10 or 100 from a given number 100–900.
    • 2.NBT.B.9
      Explain why addition and subtraction strategies work, using place value and the properties of operations.